Your one and only voice

Your one and only voice

Your one and only voice

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel

When I began graduate school I became instant friends with a talented singer who entered at the same time. One afternoon we were leaving class and walking across Harvard Square, headed to our favorite tea café. As we were walking, she stated nonchalantly (in a thick New Zealand accent), “don’t you sometimes just LOVE the sound of your voice?”

I made some attempt to half-smile, and did not answer, head down. What I was thinking was, “Um, no? Who thinks that?”

It took a long time to acknowledge and accept that my voice was… my voice. The end. No tradesies, no opting out. This is my voice, for better, for worse, for richer, for poorer. So I best figure out how to make peace with the one and only voice that I’ve got.

It took steady affirmations and much inner work to get this current place. It took a lot of falling down, and getting back up. It took quite a great deal of nurturing and reassuring. And it is a constant work in progress.

And right now, I will most certainly assure you that yes, sometimes I just LOVE the sound of my voice. But way more importantly, I just love my voice for who she is. And guess what? She is so much more than mere sound.

When we have this kind of soul-level acceptance, past the barriers of ego and self-doubt, your voice begins to change. There is something exciting that begins to brew. You have an access to greater flexibility, greater confidence, and greater flow, but amazingly: you have access to a new dimension.

This a sacred dimension. It is the place from which the sacred voice is sourced. But it is more easily defined as an inner peace that flows from within, and explodes in the form of possibility.

Have you felt that before? Or does that sound crazy to you right now? I would understand if it did. I would understand if this experience of sacredness made you feel resentful or sullen. It would have for me, just as I felt when walking to TeaLuxe with my über-confident friend. I certainly do not intend to do so.

But I want you to set aside any resistance to this state of being. Instead, allow yourself the space to hold this question: how will I use my one and only voice?

Please refrain from saying “I don’t know.” Your ego does not know, because it’s a new and intimidating question. Just hold space for your inner self to answer, because that is where the answer lies.

I ask myself this question every day. Perhaps I am never satisfied with the answer. You know why? Because using your voice, in its truest form, is challenging. I have do hard things every damn day.

This unfolding process of discovering and actualizing the voice is a life’s journey. It is also one of the most enriching and important journeys I could have hoped for in this lifetime. 

Your voice, and the pathway you walk with your voice, has the potential to transform your entire life. That is certainly what has unfolded for me.

The work and the practice is to persevere in your efforts to grow more in love and acceptance with your voice. The byproduct is the expansion of your current reality, and your expanding access to a dimension of creative potential more than you thought was possible.

Please do not let the new and intimidating nature of this journey to shut you down. I have bad news: growing bigger will always feel new and intimidating. There is simply no help for it.

But you are in good company: we all desire a true connection with our voice. We are all scared, too. But we move ahead anyway, because that is what seekers do, despite the relative discomfort of change and growth and expansion.

So knowing that the road is bumpy (unavoidable), and knowing that you have work to do (inevitable), and knowing that the result could be more gorgeous that you ever thought possible (insanely absolutely)…

How will you use your one and only voice today?

Hugs,

allison

welcome to
The Studio!

I’m Allison Mondel, Transformational Voice Coach and big-hearted seeker on a mission to help others discover their innate, brilliant Sacred Voice, and transform their singing and their lives.

further reading

That time I sang for President Obama
That time I sang for President Obama

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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How do you (actually) use your sacred voice?
How do you (actually) use your sacred voice?

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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Your one and only voice
Your one and only voice

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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how to really change your voice

how to really change your voice

how to really change your voice

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel

How long does it take to change your voice?

We are conditioned to think of this process in terms of hours, days, weeks, months, and years. There is an element of playing the long game when we envision the process of unfolding that is our voice journey. This is absolutely unavoidable, and when embraced as a concept, can be the capstone project of life’s great journey.

But there is another kind of change that can happen instantaneously. The kind of change that we do not expect. Change that makes us sit up and say, “my voice is different. Mm, that’s wonderful.”

We all have some aspect of our voice (or laundry list of issues) that we would like to improve, remove, or transform. My question to you: how much time are you willing to co-exist with stress, potential suffering, and that existential “oh, well” that has become how you view your singing?

Hours, days, weeks, months, years?

When placed in this kind of frame, this doesn’t even make sense! Because the issues we confront in our singing practice seem timeless, don’t they? They will always be here, right?

My voice is getting older, I will never feel good about it again.

My voice is stuck, I guess that’s the way it is.

My voice is faulty, I will never be able to have control.

NO. That inner “oh, well, I guess this is the way it is” is a mask for what I view as an intense friction between you and your voice.

Friction is uncomfortable. It builds heat slowly, until one day it becomes unbearable, you cannot avoid it, and you are at your wit’s end. But somehow we humans have managed how to stay at our wit’s end for a very long time, indeed.

But you are enabled with a choice: are you willing to live with this friction for an indefinite period of time, or are you willing to change?

Are you willing to default to suffering for hours, days, weeks, months, years with this numbing “oh well,” or are you willing to release the friction in one, single second of a moment?

The preferred answer is obvious. But dear Lord, how?

Once you muster the will to change, there is nothing more that you need to do except to state your new intention:

“I no longer want to live with _______. I am ready to change how I feel about my _______.”

That’s it. But what happens then?

What happens is the sweet unfolding of your new voice timeline. A proverbial fork in the road, where the suffering is not met with more suffering in a steady downgrade, but with clarity, ah-has, inner guidance, and a knowing that you are on the Right Track.

Every choice I have made to release my limited beliefs about my voice has resulted in nothing short of a million mini-miracles unfolding before me. Importantly, when I rub up against some new, unexplored friction (which there always is!), I know how to release it because I have a template.

The inner resistance to my expansion and the healing of my voice becomes easier to manage and overcome. I recognize the patterns, and I have learned to trust the outcome.

The only friction that remains is that which you feel when your ego voice reminds you that this should be harder… you should be more uncomfortable… you can wait it out… it’s not that bad… who are you to want more, you are not that good anyway… you don’t have enough skills… just give up trying… 

You do not have to suffer on account of your voice, my friend. But you must be willing to overcome the volume of the ego voice, to relieve the burn of that invisible, sneaky, sweet-talking psychic friction, and to demand better for yourself.

And that, my friend, is how you heal. It is through the choices you make, and the intentions you state, that initiate that transformation to feeling better and to changing your voice.

I will warn you: there is no confetti, no trumpets, no unfolding scrolls of proclamation, no noisy celebrations for you. Just the profound beat of your own heart that pounds with the knowing that you made the right choice.

And then you feel different. You have changed. And your voice feels different. It has changed.

And then you say, “mm, that’s wonderful.”

Hugs,

allison

welcome to
The Studio!

I’m Allison Mondel, Transformational Voice Coach and big-hearted seeker on a mission to help others discover their innate, brilliant Sacred Voice, and transform their singing and their lives.

further reading

That time I sang for President Obama
That time I sang for President Obama

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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How do you (actually) use your sacred voice?
How do you (actually) use your sacred voice?

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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Your one and only voice
Your one and only voice

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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Sensitivity is double-sided

Sensitivity is double-sided

Sensitivity is double-sided

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel

“You are too sensitive.”

“Stop being so sensitive.”

“I am too sensitive.”

I have heard and said these statements my entire life. And for good reason: I am insanely positively heroically epically sensitive.

It takes a lifetime to understand that being sensitive is not a flaw or failing to overcome. It is a trait to be integrated healthfully into your experience.

This realization took a long time for me to understand, as I understood my sensitivity to be of the utmost inconvenience in just about every life situation. Early school experiences were particularly grim, as the little girl constantly crying in every class was perhaps a little frustrating? 

“Allison is TOO sensitive.”

Well, cue adulthood (and music career), and learning how to fruitfully grow into the authentic, loving person and artist you were born to be, in spite of all the personal and societal conditioning that reminds you that you are faulty and you should definitely toughen up.

And by my estimation, being sensitive actually is a hindrance if past experiences have triggered a defensive response to, well, life.

Why?

Because being sensitive means you feel a lot when you take it all in. It means you have extra receptivity capabilities, and it means that you process the world around you in a way that is amplified emotionally. 

Is that a problem? Of course not.

But when we are not taught how to manage this superpower (which we are not), it can lead to an automated response of over-reactivity

Let’s put this in the context of our musical life and using our voice.

Can you imagine an experience when you were singing, and someone stopped to correct or criticize what you were doing? 

Of course you can, there are a million.

But I bet there was one or two that particularly stung. What was your reaction?

Did that overcome you? Did that make you reel? Did that shut you down?

I would understand perfectly if it did. But why did that happen? What was it about whatever someone else said or did or thought that had such brute force to initiate such a response?

You were in a state of open and delightful vulnerability, following your heart’s desire and delight.

You were singing. You were open. You were brave. You were happy. You were you.

And then BOOM. Shut it down. Close the curtain. Turn off the lights.

Because if you are sensitive, any kind of perceived criticism is amplified to the nth degree. Unless we are taught how to emotionally manage or prepare for this kind of arbitrary feedback, we experience a blow to our system. And subsequently construct a defensive mechanism for our selves that allows for protection against future criticism.

Or perhaps even protection from ourselves.

Ah. I feel that. I also know many people who long to follow their heart’s desire and delight but it it just. too. painful. Are they too sensitive? 

NO. If this is you, I am going to tell you that you are not “too” sensitive. But you are, in fact, sensitive. It is not a failing. It is a trait. It is best accepted as soon as possible, and waste no more time in wondering why you are not tougher.

That is not worth your time.

I invite you to conceive of sensitivity as one of your greatest strengths. What was once an absolutely crushing personality quirk is one of my greatest gifts: to feel.

To feel is not a sin. The work is to re-learn How to Feel when you step into any given situation, especially when you sing.

But hear me on this: you must set the parameters for yourself.

Otherwise, you are going to be awash in a sea of your own reactivity to external stimuli, even of the most benign variety. Your egoic fears and past conditioning will dictate how that is going to look and feel.

And we all know how THAT is going to go.

If you are committed to discovering your inner voice, and allowing that part of yourself to show up, and to thrive, I have some… not great news.

You are going to meet those previous reactions to criticism. You are going to encounter a version of yourself that conceives of this heightened reactivity as a problem. You are going to feel things. Not easy things. But manageable, nonetheless.

The things that you have encountered along your journey of singing are the very things I want you to reconsider as the most important reminders of why you love to sing. 

Singing, using your voice, communicating through music, creative endeavors… these are the ways in which we access the deepest and most authentic aspects of our being.

Being sensitive is normal. Early responses to criticism are normal. Heightened reactivity to criticism is normal. Not knowing how to manage emotions is normal.

Until you realize that you want more and you want to feel better. Then the soul kicks in.

You learn how to accept your sensitive nature. You guide others who are sensitive. And when you have the capacity to understand how your experiences – no matter what they might be  – shape who you are, you choose who you want to become.

Here is to your squishy, loving, gloriously feeling and sensitive self. (Thank God!)

Hugs,

allison

welcome to
The Studio!

I’m Allison Mondel, Transformational Voice Coach and big-hearted seeker on a mission to help others discover their innate, brilliant Sacred Voice, and transform their singing and their lives.

further reading

That time I sang for President Obama
That time I sang for President Obama

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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How do you (actually) use your sacred voice?
How do you (actually) use your sacred voice?

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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Your one and only voice
Your one and only voice

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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Are you a Singer or a Non-Singer?

Are you a Singer or a Non-Singer?

Are you a Singer or a Non-Singer?

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel

Many of my clients will identify with one of these two designations, usually so they can tell me what I can expect when I hear them sing! 

However, the answer to whether you are a Singer or Non-Singer has everything to do with… you.

But it is a perennial question for many people, and I believe it can cause some pain for some. What I think it really asks is: how do you use your voice?

Your relationship with your voice is shaped and molded over many years, since the moment you began to use it, really. You have been imprinted by your family, school, society, some of whom have a stake in your well-being, and some who could care less. 

But I know YOU care.

Whether you are a Singer is a question of your identity. And ultimately, it has nothing to do with other people. It has to do with you. How do you define yourself? How do you embrace or reject this designation of “singer”? 

Well, how does it make you feel? 

I am someone who has chosen a pathway in the field of music, vocal music to be specific. I have training in singing. I am an expert in vocal technique. I sing publicly for a fee. Therefore I must be a singer, right?

Um, not so clear, actually. 

I actually retired from Soprano Life, because the pursuit of Soprano-hood was making me miserable. During the pandemic, it was impossible for me to find my footing with a singing practice because there were one million other things that I needed to prioritize and I was having a hard time, like everyone else.

Am I still a singer?

Let’s reframe the response. I am someone who loves to use their voice. I love to sing. (Most of the time.) And I am learning to use my voice. 

Please do not fret if this question gives you agida. I ask the question because I know it may evoke a feeling of discomfort for some. But I want you to examine whether or not that discomfort is coming from within, or without. 

Who defines what you do with your voice? You. 

You have permission to sing in whatever genre you please, to enjoy whatever song you enjoy, to cast away the expectation that you should be able to do something by now, or have it all figured out.

You certainly do NOT have to have it all figured out! But please hear me: you also do not have to exist in a constant state of existential crisis as to how you use your voice, or how you define yourself vocally or musically. Staying confused and unclear is another choice you can make that not only defines, but confirms, your identity.

I don’t recommend it.

If you are someone who is unclear about how you use your voice, I recommend you begin a new narrative for your singing identity:

I am discovering how to use my voice.

Take the edge off, dear one. No need to fuel your doubts with fear and regret. But remember that only you can define your identity.

So are you a singer or a non-singer?

It doesn’t matter. This question drives me bonkers. Let’s trash the damn category. 

Hugs,

allison

IMAGE: Photo by Sebastian Unrau on Unsplash

welcome to
The Studio!

I’m Allison Mondel, Transformational Voice Coach and big-hearted seeker on a mission to help others discover their innate, brilliant Sacred Voice, and transform their singing and their lives.

further reading

That time I sang for President Obama
That time I sang for President Obama

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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How do you (actually) use your sacred voice?
How do you (actually) use your sacred voice?

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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Your one and only voice
Your one and only voice

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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Take back control of your voice

Take back control of your voice

Take back control of your voice

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel

One of my favorite movies is The Wizard of Oz. I had a mural of Oz painted on my childhood bedroom wall. I even had the theme of the decorations for my bat mitzvah reception decked in Oz technicolor. One of the most creative was a “smoky” sign  made of wire and cotton hung from the ceiling that read “Surrender, Allison.”

(How prescient!)

I think of this sign all the time. It reminds me of the #1 lesson that I have learned in singing, and in life.

Using your voice is easily one of the most vulnerable and courageous acts we undertake. And I am certain that your voice has a lot to say, to express, and to share. But that fact, in and of itself, is enough to make us clam up and hold back. And it triggers an internal response to control the situation.

We are wired to move a hot current of energy through our frames. And when you sing, that energy is amplified. But we are not taught how to effectively manage that energy. We are taught, rather, that we need to manipulate the sound in order to meet some kind of invisible standard of alright-ness. (Fuh-gedda-bout energy!)

For whom does it need to be alright enough?

If you are a human being reading this, I know for sure that your efforts to manipulate your sound may feel frustrating at times. Why? Because you have been trying to control the sound, rather than allow the energy.

Wanting to gain control of your voice is a response to feeling, well, out of control. You have not learned – yet – how to manage that hot current, and it is intense! Possibly even life-threatening.

The mind has its own internal safety protocols that will inherently trigger a red flag when it is threatened. It will begin pulling levers for you. The mind says, let’s work proactively so that this process does not have to be so scary!

The Ego Voice takes over. In singing, this may look like: holding the gut muscles; holding back sound; pushing through the tightness of your throat; over-working the articulation of the words with the mouth; gearing up for a high note with some errant squeeze; and evaluate, evaluate, evaluate every moment of each phrase for quality (ahem) control.

Lack of control in your singing is a terrible feeling. And it’s complicated: there are so many layers to how you experience your voice, including your personality, past experiences, training (or lack thereof), self-esteem, or that you simply have no idea what you’re supposed to be doing other than, well, manipulating your sound to be Alright Enough.

Let’s regain control of the situation.

First, consider this…

What if your need for control was in direct proportion to how much energy is flowing through you? 

  • Can you envision that wild current of energy?
  • Can you feel it?
  • Can you understand that holding on to the sound of that energy is inherently limiting its audacious potential?

Then consider…

  • How can you allow a more free-flowing movement of this energy?
  • What is keeping you from this flow?
  • When do you stop it?
  • What is the internal message you hear when it is moving through you right before you sing?

I believe the real work is to understand that channeling the power of our voice is not a mortal threat. It is part of our purpose.

So how can we transmute the impulse to control our voice? We learn to allow our voice.

I invite you to practice strengthening your Allow muscle. Make it an experiment: tinker with the idea. Try this mantra in your singing practice:

“Surrender, Dorothy.” (But please insert your name instead.)

And remember: when you feel the need to control, remind yourself that there is something deeply powerful that would appreciate moving through in that moment. And the most annoying – but true – piece of the whole surrender puzzle?

When you let go, you regain control.

Hugs,

allison

IMAGE: Photo from The Wizard of Oz

welcome to
The Studio!

I’m Allison Mondel, Transformational Voice Coach and big-hearted seeker on a mission to help others discover their innate, brilliant Sacred Voice, and transform their singing and their lives.

further reading

That time I sang for President Obama
That time I sang for President Obama

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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How do you (actually) use your sacred voice?
How do you (actually) use your sacred voice?

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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Your one and only voice
Your one and only voice

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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What I really learned working with coaches from the Met

What I really learned working with coaches from the Met

What I really learned working with coaches from the Met

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel

When I was a junior in college, I had a very audacious and ambitious voice teacher who was making a go as an opera singer. She managed to wiggle herself and two of her budding students (including me!) into a workshop series led by Nico and Carol Castel, legendary coaches at the Met.

It was a very good thing I had no idea who these people were, or who would be there, or what anyone was singing. All I knew was that I was going to have six consecutive Friday night adventures to the Upper West Side and I would get off campus and go to New York and sing and it would be fun!

It was fun. It was also the most intimidating thing I have ever done. I could not have been more green, but it didn’t matter. I did not take away any sour memories whatsoever, because I learned so much, and had no aspirations to become an opera singer in the first place!

But the most indelible moment came not from my own coaching, but from from observing another soprano, let’s call her Deb.

It was Deb’s first turn, she got up and introduced herself. Deb said (with some hesitation) that she had been working on her own, trying to discover her voice.

Deb then announced she was going to sing “(Something That Sounded Like It Was Printed In Fraktur)” from Die Blah Blah by Wagner and said she was looking for help with (Deb’s Musico Textual Issue).

And I thought, “hm, interesting, this is not going to be very good, she is singing Wagner and doesn’t even have a teacher!” 

You would not believe the sound that came forth into this teeny tiny living room. I thought this was the most insanely talented person I had ever heard. Her voice was loud, it could move mountains, it was way too much to handle in that tiny apartment. But she let it rip, no holding back.

Her presence hooked me, it was profound, and I gazed at Deb in wonder: how did she DO that?

I surmise that she did something very, very brave amidst a deeply entrenched musical culture: she allowed the time and space to cultivate her own sense of herself and her voice, what she needed, and discern what she wanted to say and do.

She then sought help when she was good and ready, and could ask clearly for what she needed.

YES.

And my biggest takeway from working with the best coaches at the Met? 

Be like Deb.

Honor yourself, and please honor your needs. This may be an unpopular opinion, inasmuch as your ego is concerned. There is a lot of gray area here, and no conclusive answers to your most burning questions in the immediate moment.

There is a lot of inner and outer noise about how and who and what to be. Please hear me: the only voice that truly matters is the one deep within your heart and soul.

What would happen if you let that inner voice guide you, rather than the crowd? What inner magic would be cultivated if you could stir your own artistic cauldron? Take a moment to at least ask the question: how do I envision using my voice right now? 

Hugs, 

allison

IMAGE: Photo by Meredith Owens on Unsplash 

welcome to
The Studio!

I’m Allison Mondel, Transformational Voice Coach and big-hearted seeker on a mission to help others discover their innate, brilliant Sacred Voice, and transform their singing and their lives.

further reading

That time I sang for President Obama
That time I sang for President Obama

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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How do you (actually) use your sacred voice?
How do you (actually) use your sacred voice?

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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Your one and only voice
Your one and only voice

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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