Take back control of your voice

Take back control of your voice

Take back control of your voice

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel

One of my favorite movies is The Wizard of Oz. I had a mural of Oz painted on my childhood bedroom wall. I even had the theme of the decorations for my bat mitzvah reception decked in Oz technicolor. One of the most creative was a “smoky” sign  made of wire and cotton hung from the ceiling that read “Surrender, Allison.”

(How prescient!)

I think of this sign all the time. It reminds me of the #1 lesson that I have learned in singing, and in life.

Using your voice is easily one of the most vulnerable and courageous acts we undertake. And I am certain that your voice has a lot to say, to express, and to share. But that fact, in and of itself, is enough to make us clam up and hold back. And it triggers an internal response to control the situation.

We are wired to move a hot current of energy through our frames. And when you sing, that energy is amplified. But we are not taught how to effectively manage that energy. We are taught, rather, that we need to manipulate the sound in order to meet some kind of invisible standard of alright-ness. (Fuh-gedda-bout energy!)

For whom does it need to be alright enough?

If you are a human being reading this, I know for sure that your efforts to manipulate your sound may feel frustrating at times. Why? Because you have been trying to control the sound, rather than allow the energy.

Wanting to gain control of your voice is a response to feeling, well, out of control. You have not learned – yet – how to manage that hot current, and it is intense! Possibly even life-threatening.

The mind has its own internal safety protocols that will inherently trigger a red flag when it is threatened. It will begin pulling levers for you. The mind says, let’s work proactively so that this process does not have to be so scary!

The Ego Voice takes over. In singing, this may look like: holding the gut muscles; holding back sound; pushing through the tightness of your throat; over-working the articulation of the words with the mouth; gearing up for a high note with some errant squeeze; and evaluate, evaluate, evaluate every moment of each phrase for quality (ahem) control.

Lack of control in your singing is a terrible feeling. And it’s complicated: there are so many layers to how you experience your voice, including your personality, past experiences, training (or lack thereof), self-esteem, or that you simply have no idea what you’re supposed to be doing other than, well, manipulating your sound to be Alright Enough.

Let’s regain control of the situation.

First, consider this…

What if your need for control was in direct proportion to how much energy is flowing through you? 

  • Can you envision that wild current of energy?
  • Can you feel it?
  • Can you understand that holding on to the sound of that energy is inherently limiting its audacious potential?

Then consider…

  • How can you allow a more free-flowing movement of this energy?
  • What is keeping you from this flow?
  • When do you stop it?
  • What is the internal message you hear when it is moving through you right before you sing?

I believe the real work is to understand that channeling the power of our voice is not a mortal threat. It is part of our purpose.

So how can we transmute the impulse to control our voice? We learn to allow our voice.

I invite you to practice strengthening your Allow muscle. Make it an experiment: tinker with the idea. Try this mantra in your singing practice:

“Surrender, Dorothy.” (But please insert your name instead.)

And remember: when you feel the need to control, remind yourself that there is something deeply powerful that would appreciate moving through in that moment. And the most annoying – but true – piece of the whole surrender puzzle?

When you let go, you regain control.

Hugs,

allison

IMAGE: Photo from The Wizard of Oz

welcome to
The Studio!

I’m Allison Mondel, Transformational Voice Coach and big-hearted seeker on a mission to help others discover their innate, brilliant Sacred Voice, and transform their singing and their lives.

further reading

Are you a Singer or a Non-Singer?
Are you a Singer or a Non-Singer?

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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Take back control of your voice
Take back control of your voice

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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What I really learned working with coaches from the Met
What I really learned working with coaches from the Met

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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Five Ways to Improve Your Relationship with your Voice

Five Ways to Improve Your Relationship with your Voice

Five Ways to Improve Your Relationship with your Voice

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel

How do you conceive of your voice?

For most of us, we tend to think about one thing: how it sounds.

“This is my voice! This is how it sounds. I will assess my voice on the quality of its sound.”

My journey of voice discovery has led me to develop quite a different understanding. I had to learn – the hard way – that assessing my sound, and certainly worrying over-muchly about what Others thought of my sound, was creating a very toxic situation.

And yet, our voice is so much more than sound.

The difference is the conception of our voice as the manifestation of our sacredness and whole being, rather than the relative quality of the sound that emanates through our mouths.

But we all know that there are inherent challenges in using our voices, and singing as we we would wish, and making the easeful, lovely sounds that we all long for, and communicating the very best things through music and language.

The challenges or frustrations we may face in using our voice will naturally lead to a sense of separation with, or objectification of our voice. Which then leads to a relationship with our voice that becomes out of balance, overly critical, less integrated, and more mechanical. Indeed, it may separate us from the very content of what we wish to express when we sing, and ultimately, ourselves. 

Let us consider, then, how to reframe our conception of our voice. We can expand its capacity, and release the limiting belief that our voice is only equal to its relative quality of its sound.

Here are five ways in which you can cultivate a more loving, healthy, and joyful connection with relationship with your voice.

1) Acknowledge that your voice is not separate from you.

You are not a sound-making robot, and your voice is not a separate computer program running independently from the rest of you. Invite your voice to integrate with your whole being. I use this invocation: I call forth my Sacred Voice. Use your own words, as you feel inspired. Notice how this shift makes you feel and how it affects the way you produce sound.

2) Make a pledge to cease all negative critique.

I’m dead serious here. Throw down the gauntlet for yourself. Removing negativity is an instant way to clear the debris that is cluttering up your pathway to using your voice. I suggest making a pledge that goes something like: “I pledge that I will no longer abuse my voice or myself when I sing.” Words are powerful, Dear One. Especially yours.

3) Connect with your voice.

Easily one of the most powerful methods to grow the health and wellness of your voice is to communicate with your voice on a deeper level. I have a regular journaling practice that keeps me in touch with my higher self. Whenever I run into any trouble or doubt, or am unclear about a way forward, I pick up a pen and journal (or honestly any piece of printer paper lying around) and ask my voice for what it needs, what is blocking me, or whatever is coming up in the moment that I would like to shift. 

4) Shift from the assessing the quality of sound to the quality of production.

My friend, you would be the most normal person ever if you are listening to yourself as you sing. I have very bad news for you: this is not beneficial for healthy, well, connected, free singing. What it will do is further separate you from your voice and add a great deal of mental noise and tension. Rather, practice allowing your focus to be on the heart-centered awareness of your Self, and then the breath. This will allow you to gain a clearer vision of what you hope to express, tap into your intuition, make adjustments in the moment, and ultimately give you the freedom to choose and create whatever sound you desire. The practice is to return to the heart center over and over and over again. Notice the way you feel about your voice as a result. 

5) Assume that your voice has the capacity to work just fine.

When we do not trust our voice, or doubt our sound, we tend to jump to the conclusion that our voice is broken/ weird/ bad/ or faulty. A recipe for a toxic relationship! Please hear me: your factory settings are enough. Most likely, like any computer you have ever had, your mind has become overrun with too many files and outdated programs that affect its capacity to operate effectively. So rather than jump to the conclusion that your voice is (insert some judgment here), consider that your voice is just fine, and perhaps something is obscuring its natural light. That something is probably your greatest insight on how to move forward on your voice journey.

I invite you to consider your relationship with your voice. How could you improve the way you relate to your sound? Could any one of these points help you create a more positive impact on how you use your voice?

Your voice has so much capacity, so much depth, so much beauty to bring forth. I believe it starts with a healthy, whole relationship.

Hugs, 

allison

welcome to
The Studio!

I’m Allison Mondel, Transformational Voice Coach and big-hearted seeker on a mission to help others discover their innate, brilliant Sacred Voice, and transform their singing and their lives.

further reading

Are you a Singer or a Non-Singer?
Are you a Singer or a Non-Singer?

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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Take back control of your voice
Take back control of your voice

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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What I really learned working with coaches from the Met
What I really learned working with coaches from the Met

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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shifting gears

shifting gears

shifting gears

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel

I will never forget that time when I stalled out and was stuck in a rental car in the middle of a busy road in Limerick, Ireland. I had literally just pulled out of the rental parking lot, on my way to Kildare, driving crossways east across the country by myself. On the wrong side of the road. With a freaking stick-shift.

Panic overtook me, as people were justifiably annoyed at this disturbance in the flow of traffic, and I could not get out of first gear. “You have done this a million times. You can do it, Allison!” I coached myself.

Nope. Still couldn’t move. What is the problem???

Then a clear little voice from within said: “Look down.” Oof, the parking brake was still on. So, with this quick little fix I was off and on my way on a solo road trip across Ireland, cry-laughing my way out of the city. 

I was rattled. I was also wise to the fact that this trip was a big deal. I was overwhelmed, and I had no idea what I was doing, and I was alone, and I was all backwards.

But I am also aware that some part of my subconscious mind was scared out of its wits to actually head toward my destination. No wonder I forgot the parking brake! I had trained my car to follow my ego voice. And I even placed myself in grave physical danger just to avoid taking the next step.

Wtf?

I was going to Kildare to meet Saint Brigid. It was a pilgrimage. I was going there to unite with a part of myself that was, in the cradle of her holy place, precious and worthy.

It is hard enough to get out of first gear. But when you try to move with your parking brake on, well, you are not going anywhere. And eventually you will burn out.

So the real question I have is: how do we move ahead when we are scared?

How can we receive a desire for our self, for our voice, for our artistry, that is fulfilling, satisfying, nourishing? It may be a Big Thing or a small thing. It may alter your career, or just make you feel better.

You know when something is ready to shift because you recognize that something is off. Not working. Funky. Unsettled. Wanting. Hungry. Uneasy.

This is good.

This is a reminder that your voice is here to speak and sing for a good reason. These are the signs that your voice yearns for its expression, and it means that we have something of great value to share. There is a power moving through you, and it has potency. The hymn within you is ready to be born.

What can be excruciating is the silent withholding of that something, of your hymn.

How long will this uneasiness last? That depends on you. I believe it depends partly on divine timing, but also our willingness to step into the I-don’t-know-ness of change and growth along our journey.

I am knee deep in it, my friend. I have done it before, though. I know what is on the other side of soul voice itchiness: release and renewal. And honestly, relief.

But there is a place in the cycle of artistic growth that is akin to being stuck and panicked in the middle of a busy road in Limerick. For me it resembles an inner frenzy, trying to know what is next and make sure it is the Right Thing or else.

But when given enough mental and emotional space, the soul shines through with an inner clarity that says: look right here. Right in your heart. Yes, that’s it. Hold that for a moment: now go.

The heart always knows the answers.

I believe the hardest part for us is the commitment: to commit to the next course along your journey. Even if you do not know what it looks like, or how many miles it may be, or what people will think, or who you will be at the end.

It is so hard Not Knowing. And it is always hard to change. But our practice is honoring the holy place within that is precious to you. That is, indeed, worthy of being expressed. Can you commit to honoring this aspect of your Self?

Don’t worry if you feel resistance. That’s normal. But when you are ready to move, there is only one thing you need to do.

Just release the damn parking brake.

Hugs,

allison

welcome to
The Studio!

I’m Allison Mondel, Transformational Voice Coach and big-hearted seeker on a mission to help others discover their innate, brilliant Sacred Voice, and transform their singing and their lives.

IMAGE: Some impossible road I encountered in Ireland, 2018.

further reading

Are you a Singer or a Non-Singer?
Are you a Singer or a Non-Singer?

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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Take back control of your voice
Take back control of your voice

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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What I really learned working with coaches from the Met
What I really learned working with coaches from the Met

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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to err is human

to err is human

to err is human

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel

I have mastered the art of “Don’t let ’em see you sweat.” That’s easy. That’s what you learn in professional training: the art of illusion.

What I have not mastered is the art of Not Sweating.

Have you? What do you sweat about?

I sweat about, oh God, the same thing I always do: sounding nice.

Seriously. After allllll this time and work and care and thought and healing and tears and journaling and practice and blog posts and coachings.

Do I sound… nice?

At present I find myself on the opposite end of a recent production in which I masterminded every artistic element with intentionality and purpose. Except my own performance. That was left utterly to chance, to improv, to trust that my decades of skill-building and half-decent form would lead the way, and I could breeze through without a drop of sweat.

My friend, that did not happen.

No one can see me sweating, that is my magic trick. But if my thoughts were any indication, I was swimming in anxiety, trying to settle my nerves, get back into my body (which had left the building, maybe I wore the wrong shoes?), and get present enough to draw on my very abundant inner resources for having a beautiful experience.

But the mind hijacked the situation: do I sound nice?

What would your mind say?

Why?

The mind is compensating.

This lesson is so big that it is difficult to contain.

There is so much power running through our vocal circuits, that we do not know how to hold space, so we short out. We are overwhelmed. The mind shorts our circuits. It is protecting us from the “discomfort” of our own power.

I guarantee you that is exactly what happened in my own situation. I felt like a lightning rod of creativity and vitality and adrenaline and sacredness. But the best I could come up with was… does this sound nice?

How banal!

But it worked. I faltered and stumbled. I was left with that feeling of “If only I… (practiced more. learned my lesson. didn’t have that stupid f&%^ing mask. wasn’t singing in a pandemic. wore a different dress. thought this through. wasn’t so lazy.)”

And not only do I have to wince as I listen to the results, but I have to share this on the internet for Planet Earth to hear me sweat.

It takes a huge heaping dose of Inner Grace to understand what really occurs in these moments of absolute humanness: we must falter in order to grow. We must accept the  seemingly intolerable discomfort of the learning process, because there is only one way to go. We must walk through the fire of our ego’s matrix of self-protections.

Because on the other side we meet our divine purpose.

I, too, am learning how to inhabit a vessel of immense sacred power, as I learn how to use my voice. It is an educational cycle: we learn and re-learn the same lessons as we continue to up-level, evolve, and live into that elusive purpose that is right under our noses.

The lesson is always kinder, deeper, and broader than it seems.

So the next time you start sweating, recognize the mind’s banter. Then ask yourself:
What is my soul trying to bring forth through my voice?

My follow-up question to you is: are you willing to let some of that out here on Planet Earth?

Hugs,

allison

welcome to
The Studio!

I’m Allison Mondel, Transformational Voice Coach on a mission to help others discover their innate, brilliant Sacred Voice, and transform their singing and their lives.

further reading

Are you a Singer or a Non-Singer?
Are you a Singer or a Non-Singer?

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

read more
Take back control of your voice
Take back control of your voice

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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What I really learned working with coaches from the Met
What I really learned working with coaches from the Met

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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on being capable: an essential teaching

on being capable: an essential teaching

on being capable: an essential teaching

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel

For some years now I have been exploring the nature of the “sacred voice.”

This concept is not new, and it is certainly not mine. It is an aspect of our Self that I believe we all, at some deep level, are called to express in our lives, on this earthly plane, for some very purposeful reason.

At the everyday, mundane, get-up-and-go-to-work level, it can seem quite elusive. The pursuit of this soul-fueled creative voice can truly seem untouchable, or fickle. Sometimes it seems to tease us into believing that maybe, just maybe, my voice is truly worthy of expressing something sacred? And then it seems quite the opposite.

Well, I can say with certainty that our voice is not a trickster. Sacredness is inherent, it is constant, it is… Truth. What is not constant is our capacity to hold space for the power of our sacredness.

What does that mean in terms of our voice? How does that affect our singing practice?

It comes down to feeling capable, steady, and trusting.

I want to share one of my most essential teachings with you:

Most singers tend to believe that they are not capable enough, so they doubt themselves and lose trust in their voice.

But the reality is that singers have not learned how to harness and trust the intense, powerful energy of their voice and fully access their sacredness.

What does it mean to hold space for the true power of your voice?

It means to become a vessel for your voice. To allow your voice to flow through you freely, without hindrance from ego and fear.

Here is the process broken down:

1) Acknowledge your sacred nature.
2) Become aware of the force of energy moving through you. The vehicle is the breath.
3) Allow the movement of this breath energy to be constant and free-flowing.

Let’s be really clear here: I know this is not as easy as it sounds. Your throat might be scratchy, or you are tense, or you are scared, or any distraction may abound to throw you off-track. You may have deep-seated, subconscious fears that hinder you. This is normal and to be expected. But it is not permanent. It is not truth.

Ultimately, our practice is to allow the full expression of our voice even when we doubt our capacity. Even when we are unsure.

When you allow this expression, when you have the courage and will to allow this powerful force to move through you unhindered, something miraculous happens.

You will become a magus. 

You will be transformed from one who does not believe they can, to one who knows they can, and does. You become the vessel of this powerful energy moving through you. And you discover that your voice, in its inherent sacredness, is innately capable.

When you feel capable, you will trust your voice.

The next time you feel yourself halt, or pull back, or flinch, or become tense, take a moment to recognize why that might be. Ask yourself:

What powerful force am I resisting right now?
Why am I resisting?
What would happen if I let my resistance down in this one moment?

If you can remove your resistance, even in one small, everyday moment, you will allow for some of the greatest breakthroughs in your practice. I call them mini-miracles. These teeny-tiny “awarenesses” are the building blocks of your transformation. Please do not discount them. Indeed, rely on them!

If I can shift your perspective in any way, I want you to know this:

Not feeling capable does not mean that anything is wrong with your voice. Indeed, I would posit that there is something so deeply powerful that is trying to move through you, and it is scary as hell.

But your voice is not meant to be controlled. It is meant to be released.

It is your very own sacredness in sound. It is a gift, my friend, for you to give to the world. Even a teensy little bit at a time is worth its weight in gold.

Hugs,

allison

welcome to
The Studio!

I’m Allison Mondel, Transformational Voice Coach on a mission to help others discover their innate, brilliant Sacred Voice, and transform their singing and their lives.

further reading

Are you a Singer or a Non-Singer?
Are you a Singer or a Non-Singer?

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

read more
Take back control of your voice
Take back control of your voice

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

read more
What I really learned working with coaches from the Met
What I really learned working with coaches from the Met

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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healing from voice rejection

healing from voice rejection

healing from voice rejection

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel

I’ll never forget the time when this man laughed in my face when I was just about to sing.

Or looked down at his desk in disappointment after I had just started to sing.

Or spent 45 minutes telling me why I wasn’t up for the job. And then asked his personal assistant to further the argument as to what was wrong with my voice.

Or told me why my best friend was better for the role. 

Or requested that I sit out a on a 19-voice piece, of which I was the 20th participant on the gig, left to pace around the nave of a massive cathedral, emptied of its chairs, vainly fighting back the tears of shame that wanted to spill forth from my eyes like raging torrents.

Voice rejection is just about the Worst. Thing. Ever.

For me, the sting of these events is worse than the transgressions of friends and lovers. This is my voice we are talking about: the thing that matters most to me.

How about you?

It is clear that our voice is a reflection of our self. Indeed it is an amplification of our self. It makes perfect sense that the ego will take an event such as a rejection, and draft its own self-destructive tract of shame and victimhood to be replayed over and over again, until we are convinced that it’s real.

Now, let’s set the record straight: it is perfectly, utterly normal for someone to not receive a job, or land a role, or “win” an audition. This is standard practice, akin to any application process. 

But after a while, my ego could not distinguish a standard rejection, or piece of critical feedback, from a rejection of my entire self.

Why not?

Because I had been shamed while being rejected.

Which cemented my inner terror of opening my mouth in front of anyone in case they were listening, for fear that I would be thrown out of the room, or outed in some way for being a totally fake singer!

This is, as they say, not cool. I am not cool with this state of being. There must be a better way, right?

I am not able to change things now. I am not able to single-handedly dismantle the broken audition process, or the patriarchy, or insist that someone exercise some decent manners when they have something unpleasant to say. This would be great! 

But it’s not a better way. The better, wiser way is to change my perception of the events that have formed this distorted perception of myself and my voice. Am I a terrible, worthless person because someone laughed in my face? Of course not. Is that a completely inappropriate action for a person hearing an audition? Um, yes.

But we cannot miss the larger point.

I believe that the events that I have experienced – the very worst, the most cringeworthy – confirm for me that I must fiercely believe in the value of my voice. Indeed, I accept that these experiences have crucial lessons embedded in them, if only I have the capacity to recognize their alchemical potential for healing and wholeness.

Do they tell me that I should work harder? Or prepare more? Or improve my technique? Or reconsider my repertoire? Or toughen up? Or learn to be emotionally bulletproof? Or just deal with it and move on because it’s normal??

Maybe. All helpful points.

I could also choose to ditch the whole singing thing because it’s just too, too painful. Which I have considered, and I know some who have chosen this path.

But I put this to you: 

How can we turn rejection into gold?

We have to see the truth: our soul voice is longing to be free to express itself here, in the world, on planet Earth.

When we experience a rejection, our ego will desperately try to protect us, and say, “FOR THE LOVE OF GOD DO NOT DO THAT AGAIN BECAUSE IT WAS AWFUL.”

But the soul says:

“You must step into your own individuality. You must love me. You must accept me. You must confront and acknowledge your very own sacredness. You must honor your voice.”

You can tell which voice is louder. But the softer voice will make you weep with inner joy and recognition because that’s what this singing business is all about: the expression of your inner sacredness.

We are part of something much bigger and grander than one small moment in time. But those painful, unpleasant moments are the triggers for deepening our love and acceptance of our Self.

I have become a fierce warrior of loving and valuing my own voice. Believe me, it drives me crazy trying, and sometimes I am so incredibly frustrated I have to laugh in exasperation.

My voice is not perfect. It is freaking challenging. But it is lovable, because I am lovable. And because I believe in the capacity of my voice to express my inmost desires, even if it sounds like a wobbly mess.

I have no idea if I could even “win” an audition any more, because it has been so long since I’ve even tried. But my voice will find its way into the world.

Accept that your voice will find its way into the world, too. Indeed, I believe your soul longs for it.

But first, acknowledge the moments that set you off course. Own them, and be free of them.

I invite you to write them here, put them down: let them go.

I will hold your hand, and we will walk together in freedom. We will use our voices to uplift the world, to heal ourselves, and expand into our own sacredness.

Hugs,

allison

welcome to
The Studio!

I’m Allison Mondel, Transformational Voice Coach and big-hearted seeker on a mission to help others discover their innate, brilliant Sacred Voice, and transform their singing and their lives.

IMAGE: Photo by Sharosh Rajasekher on Unsplash

further reading

Are you a Singer or a Non-Singer?
Are you a Singer or a Non-Singer?

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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Take back control of your voice
Take back control of your voice

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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What I really learned working with coaches from the Met
What I really learned working with coaches from the Met

W R I T T E N  B Y  Allison Mondel [dssb_sharing_buttons columns="5" btn_padding="0px||||false|false" _builder_version="4.9.2" _module_preset="default" share_font="Alata||||||||" share_text_align="left" width="90%" max_width="100%" module_alignment="left"...

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